Falling deeper and deeper in to non-place

A lot of my thoughts of late have been moving more and more down the vein of non-place and the idea of space in a super modern world.

When does a space become a place? And when is it a non-place? A non-place are areas made to serve the growing needs of a sprawling human race. They facilitate our lives but only serve their purpose with our presence.

Examples being; supermarkets, car parks, airports, hotel rooms and even buses and trains. The list is ever growing and something I seek to explore more and more through Photography.

10 Paignton Avenue

As part of an on going exploration of the relation between Life, Death and Photography, Andrew photographed the partially cleared home of his late grandparents.

The exploration, in this case, sought to document areas that trigger personal memories. From the living room where the whole family would cram in to for Christmas present opening to the chair the cousins would fight over.

Further to these personal memories come elements which all of us can connect with on a level. The difference between a worn carpet compared to where the bed once stood. The decay as part of a house which was a struggle to keep. The garden which was once a center of great pride, sitting unloved and rotting.

Secret Dockyard Exhibition – Eldon, Portsmouth

As part of the showcase of exhibitions at the culmination of the BA(Hons) Photography at the university of Portsmouth. The show ran for four weeks across May to June 2012. 

Secret Dockyard

Secret Dockyard was a photographic project during 2011 to 2012 documenting the conservation areas of Boathouse No4 in the Historic Dockyard, Portsmouth.  A historical structure in its own right, Boathouse No4 was a key part in preparations for D-Day and other aspects of World War Two.

The aim of the project was to show these otherwise unseen areas so they could be accessible to the public through photography.  The photographs themselves serve as a preservation of the areas, documenting them for generations to come.  The series was shot using large format 10×8″ black and white film and a series of fibre based contact prints which were treated using selenium.  The process of the fibre based prints and the selenium helps to preserve the photographs for as long as possible.

Through exhibition, Secret Dockyard was presented in cabinets with a glass lid.  The cabinet serving as the walls of the museum with the artifacts inside.  A large print of an overview of Boathouse No4 featured above the cabinets as the facade to a museum does from the street it is on.